The authorities in Moscow are rushing to build a dedicated £92 million hospital to cope with an expected major rise in coronavirus victims

The authorities in Moscow are rushing to build a dedicated £92 million hospital to cope with an expected major rise in coronavirus victims – despite the current number of cases in Russia standing at 34.

City mayor Sergey Sobyanin has ordered the facility even though Russia currently has among the fewest victims among major countries.

“Should the fighting reach us here, we won’t have to go too far,” said Al-Beij, 47, a shopkeeper from the Aleppo countryside. “And while we wait, at least we don’t have any problems with our neighbours. There is no better place to be.”

When they and other members of the cemetery’s living dead woke last Friday, the toll of the war had moved closer – four new graves, dug from the red earth only metres from their tent flaps, had been prepared for newcomers.

“The [International Olympic Committee] and the organising committee are not considering cancellation or a postponement – absolutely not at all,” Seiko Hashimoto, an Olympic bronze medallist and the Japanese government’s minister responsible for the games, told a news conference on Friday in Tokyo.

The IOC and Tokyo organisers have stayed on message since the viral outbreak in China three months ago spread across Asia and then the globe: The games will open as schedule on 24 July.

”The Walt Disney Company will pay its cast members during that closure period.”

Yesterday California Governor Gavin Newsom recommended against gatherings of more than 250 people to help contain the spread of coronavirus.

Officials believe that the cartel has distribution hubs in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Houston and Atlanta, in addition to a presence in 24 of Mexico’s 32 states.

Despite the apparent early success of Project Python a long battle lies ahead. The cartel, known widely by its Spanish-language acronym CJNG, is the fastest growing and most violent organisation of its kind in Mexico, where competition among rival drug gangs has fuelled an unrivalled surge of killings across the country in recent years. More than 35,000 people were murdered last year, the highest number since 1997 when Mexico began to keep a national tally of the homicide investigations being carried out.