Passengers who were in lockdown on a cruise ship in the Italian city of Civitavecchia have now been allowed to leave

Passengers who were in lockdown on a cruise ship in the Italian city of Civitavecchia have now been allowed to leave after confirmation that two people on board do not have coronavirus. 

The Costa Smeralda ship – carrying 7,000 people including some Britons – had been kept on the ship since Thursday morning after a 54-year-old Chinese woman from Macau came down with flu-like symptoms the previous night.

A British man has chosen not to board the evacuation flight from Wuhan because the Foreign Office could not confirm whether his four-year-old daughter, a Chinese national, would be allowed to join him.

Chris Hill, 38, said he was “losing faith” in the Government.

The suit says that he smeared her, and that by calling her a liar, damaged her career as an advice columnist for Elle magazine. She is seeking unspecified damages and a retraction of Trump’s statements.

Speaking to The Hill at the time of Ms Carroll’s accusation, Trump said: “I’ll say it with great respect: Number one, she’s not my type. Number two, it never happened. It never happened, OK?”

About 200 Britons who are trapped in Wuhan, the Chinese city where the outbreak started, will be quarantined at a UK military base for 14 days once the Chinese authorities finally allow them to leave.

The UK has not had a confirmed case yet, although health experts have warned that the virus is likely already here.

Last week, Iran’s industry, mining and trade ministry also reversed the crackdown on miners, issuing 1,000 cryptocurrency mining permits, a move that the country’s Information and Communications Technology Guild estimates will bring $8.5 billion into Iran’s sorely depleted coffers.

Iran’s official acknowledged interest may be new, but behind the scenes, it and other sanctioned states have been looking at cryptocurrencies for years — and, increasingly, cooperating with each other.