Iran’s Supreme Leader has bragged of giving America a ‘slap in the face’ after 22 ballistic missiles were fired at two bases in Iraq

Iran’s Supreme Leader has bragged of giving America a ‘slap in the face’ after 22 ballistic missiles were fired at two bases in Iraq – but said military actions were ‘not enough’ and vowed to kick US forces out of the region altogether.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei spoke on Iranian TV shortly after strikes hit Ain al-Asad airbase in western Iraq and Erbil International Airport in the north early Wednesday local time in revenge for the death of Qassem Soleimani.

Victims of the crash included 82 Iranians, 63 Canadians, 11 Ukrainians, 10 Swedes, four Afghans, three Germans and three Britons, according to Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko. “We express our condolences. The Ukrainian authorities continue to investigate,” Prystaiko said. Airline officials said most of the passengers were en route to the Ukrainian capital, transiting through there to other destinations.

In addition to a resolution being put forward by Michigan Democrat Elissa Slotkin, a former CIA analyst and Iraq War veteran, members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus are pushing for additional bills to block Trump in the wake of the killing of General Soleimani.

The likes of Ro Khanna and Barbara Lee are behind measures blocking funding and repealing the authorisation of military force against Iraq, issued in 2002 and used as justification for last Friday’s fatal airstrike, according to The Hill.

A Garda spokesman said the two occupants of the minibus fled on foot before taking possession of a parked car, which was intercepted by officers close to Castleblayney a short time later. The two men, aged in their 30s, are being questioned at Carrickmacross Garda Station.

Ms Sheindlin will appear on the campaign trail with Mr Bloomberg. Although the media tycoon’s $56 billion fortune ensures he has the resources to stay in the race, his late entry and relatively unknown status beyond his reputation as an anti-gun campaigner has limited his appeal.

A national average of polls puts him on 5 per cent support, in fifth place, despite having spent more than $120 million since announcing his bid in November. However, a national HarrisX/Hill poll has put him in third place, tied with Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts senator, on 11 per cent.